May 19, 2019
Headlines
Canada Crop Reports
5/17 6:23 PM

OMAHA (DTN) -- The following are highlights from Alberta's weekly crop progress report for conditions as of May 14, released May 17 from the Agriculture Financial Services Corporation, and Alberta Agriculture and Forestry, Economics and Competitiveness Branch, Statistics and Data Development Section.

The warm dry weather has attributed to substantial seeding progress provincially. Last week's average on all crops was slightly above 16% while this week's numbers for major crops is 42% complete, which is sizably higher than the five-year average of 25%.

Across Alberta, 72% of peas are in the ground, 52% of spring wheat, 40% of barley, 28% of canola and 19% of oats. At this rate, the seeding of major crops should be more or less wrapped up by June 1.

Crop emergence for major crops is in the early stages and the average is at 5% for the province. Following tradition, the south region's crop emergence average is the exception at 19%, essentially bumping up that number. The weather not only advanced seeding and emergence progress, hay and pasture fields have also benefited as they are developing and starting to see some green.

Surface soil moisture ratings in the South and North West regions saw little change as compared to last week, while the North East declined somewhat. The Central and Peace regions were affected the most. Provincially good and excellent estimates fell 6 percentage points, in turn increasing the fair and poor ratings.

Since April 1, the Western portion of the province has accumulated higher amounts of precipitation while the Eastern and Peace portions are still looking for a good general rain.

The following is a breakdown of highlights by region:

REGION ONE: SOUTHERN (STRATHMORE, LETHBRIDGE, MEDICINE HAT, FOREMOST)

-- Seeding progress moved from 48% on all crops to 67% complete on major crops over the last week.

-- Reports indicate 88% of peas are seeded with 28% emerged, 53% of canola seeded with 7% emerged, and 69% of spring wheat seeded with 24% emerged.

-- There are signs of irrigation kicking off.

-- Recent heat and moisture have supported a good start on perennials. The upcoming forecasted precipitation should contribute to further improvements.

-- Sub-surface soil moisture is estimated as 41% good or excellent, 39% fair and 20% poor.

REGION TWO: CENTRAL (RIMBEY, AIRDRIE, CORONATION, OYEN)

-- Seeding progress moved from 7% on all crops to 40% complete on major crops over the last week.

-- Reports indicate 65% of peas, 53% of spring wheat and 23% of canola are seeded.

-- Emergence of major crops is at 1%, which is relative to the late start to seeding.

-- While forage and pastures were slow to start, fields are showing signs of growth and will benefit from any precipitation.

-- Sub-surface soil moisture is estimated as 55% good or excellent, 30 fair and 15 poor.

REGION THREE: NORTH EAST (SMOKY LAKE, VERMILION, CAMROSE, PROVOST)

-- Seeding progress moved from 2% on all crops to 32% complete on major crops over the last week.

-- Reports indicate that 71% of peas, 21% of canola and 44% of spring wheat are seeded.

-- Pea emergence is at 7%, while other major crops have yet to surface.

-- Recent heat improved forage growth. More moisture is needed to stimulate all crop growth after recent dry windy conditions.

-- Sub-surface soil moisture is estimated as 70% good or excellent, 26% fair, and both poor and excessive rated at 2%.

REGION FOUR: NORTH WEST (BARRHEAD, EDMONTON, LEDUC, DRAYTON VALLEY, ATHABASCA)

-- Seeding progress moved from 1% on all crops to 39% complete on major crops over the last week.

-- Reports indicate that 75% of peas, 32% of canola and 50% of spring wheat are seeded.

-- Low numbers for seeding progress last week have understandably resulted in no emergence this week.

-- Many of the 2018 unharvested acres are now in the bin, with some acres left out in the Mayerthorpe area.

-- Forage and pasture crops have advanced due to higher temperatures.

-- Sub-surface soil moisture is estimated as 88% good or excellent, both fair and excessive are rated at 6%.

REGION FIVE: PEACE RIVER (FAIRVIEW, FALHER, GRANDE PRAIRIE, VALLEYVIEW)

-- Seeding progress moved from 2% on all crops to 29% complete on major crops over the last week.

-- Reports indicate that 47% of peas, 20% of canola and 39% of spring wheat are seeded.

-- Nominal emergence is relative to the late start to seeding.

-- Sub-surface soil moisture is estimated as 73% good or excellent, 13% fair, 3% poor and 11% at excessive.


SASKATCHEWAN CROP REPORT

Significant seeding progress was made this past week as 38% of Saskatchewan's crop is now in the ground, ahead of the five-year average.

OMAHA (DTN) -- The following are highlights from the weekly crop report from Saskatchewan Agriculture, for the period May 7 to May 13. The report was released May 16.

Significant seeding progress was made this past week as 38% of the crop is now in the ground, ahead of the five-year average (2014-2018) of 31% for this time of year. Crops are slow to emerge due to cool conditions.

Seeding is furthest advanced in the southeastern region, where 53% of the crop is in the ground. Fifty-two percent of the crop is seeded in the southwest, with 31% seeded in the east-central region, 32% in the west-central region, 22% in the northeast and 28% in the northwest.

Rainfall was reported this past week throughout the province. The Nipawin area received the greatest amount: 21 millimeters. Most regions of the province need rain to help alleviate dry field conditions.

Provincially, cropland topsoil moisture is rated as 1% surplus, 52% adequate, 40% short and 7% very short. Topsoil moisture on hay land and pasture is rated as 46% adequate, 40% short and 14% very short. Hay and pasture growth has been slow due to little rainfall and cool conditions.

Winter wheat assessments are continuing as fields green up and temperatures rise. Farmers are busy seeding, working fields, controlling weeds and moving cattle.

The following are the results by district:

SOUTHEASTERN SASKATCHEWAN (CROP DISTRICT 1 -- CARNDUFF, ESTEVAN, REDVERS, MOOSOMIN AND KIPLING AREAS; CROP DISTRICT 2 -- WEYBURN, MILESTONE, MOOSE JAW, REGINA AND QU'APPELLE AREAS; CROP DISTRICT 3ASE -- RADVILLE AND LAKE ALMA AREAS)

Producers in the southeastern region have made excellent progress as the amount of seed in the ground has more than doubled since last week. Fifty-three percent of the crop is now seeded, up from 23% last week and well-ahead of the five-year (2014-2018) average of 44% for this time of year.

Rainfall was reported in the region this past week, with 5 millimters falling in the Frobisher, Broadview and Glenavon areas. The Stoughton area received 13 mm and the Indian Head area 16 mm. The Indian Head area has received the most precipitation since April 1 (64 mm).

Cropland topsoil moisture is rated as 65% adequate, 33% short and 2% very short. Hay land and pasture topsoil moisture is rated as 40% adequate, 54% short and 6% very short. Hay and pasture are slow to grow, and moisture is needed to help establish a hay crop. Crops are slow to emerge due to cool conditions.

Spring winter wheat assessments continue as fields green up and temperatures rise. Farmers are busy seeding, working fields, controlling weeds and moving cattle.

SOUTHWESTERN SASKATCHEWAN (CROP DISTRICT 3ASW -- CORONACH, ASSINIBOIA AND OGEMA AREAS; CROP DISTRICT 3AN -- GRAVELBOURG, MOSSBANK, MORTLACH AND CENTRAL BUTTE AREAS; CROP DISTRICT 3B -- KYLE, SWIFT CURRENT , SHAUNAVON AND PONTEIX AREAS; CROP DISTRICT 4 -- CONSUL, MAPLE CREEK AND LEADER AREAS)

Fifty-two percent of the crop is now seeded, up significantly from 14% last week and ahead of the five-year (2014-2018) average of 48% for this time of year.

Parts of the region reported receiving precipitation ranging from small amounts to 18 mm (Rockglen area). The Mossbank area reported 13 mm, while the Webb and Shaunavon areas reported 7 mm. The Shaunavon area has received the most precipitation since April 1 (90 mm).

Cropland topsoil moisture is rated as 1% surplus, 54% adequate, 41% short and 4% very short. Hay land and pasture topsoil moisture is rated as 56% adequate, 33% short and 11% very short. While producers have indicated that moisture is adequate for seeding, rain will be needed in the coming weeks to help with crop establishment.

Cool weather has slowed pasture growth and crop emergence in many areas.

There are concerns about poor-quality water for livestock. Farmers are busy seeding, working fields, branding and moving cattle.

EAST-CENTRAL SASKATCHEWAN (CROP DISTRICT 5 -- MELVILLE, YORKTON, CUPAR, KAMSACK, FOAM LAKE, PREECEVILLE AND KELVINGTON AREAS; CROP DISTRICT 6A -- LUMSDEN, CRAIK, WATROUS AND CLAVET AREAS)

Seeding operations are well underway in the region. Thirty-one percent of the crop is in the ground, up from 7% last week and well-ahead of the five-year (2014-2018) average of 18% for this time of year. Due to the dry spring field conditions, some producers are able to seed areas in fields that have been unworkable in the last few years.

The majority of the region did not receive much rain last week, although the Goodeve, Ituna and Earl Grey areas reported 12 mm and the Esterhazy, Langenburg, Raymore, Rama, Elfros, Allan and Bethune areas 3 mm. The Esterhazy area has received the most precipitation since April 1 (35 mm).

Cropland topsoil moisture is rated as 44% adequate, 43% short and 13% very short. Hay land and pasture topsoil moisture is rated as 32% adequate, 41% short and 27% very short. While producers have indicated that moisture is adequate for seeding, rain will be needed in the coming weeks to help with crop establishment.

Pastures are slow to green up in many areas due to the cool weather; however, the forecast favorable conditions will help growth. Producers have indicated that low temperatures are making pre-seeding weed control difficult as there is little weed growth.

Farmers are busy seeding, working fields, fixing fences and moving cattle.

WEST-CENTRAL SASKATCHEWAN (CROP DISTRICTS 6B -- HANLEY, OUTLOOK, LOREBURN, SASKATOON AND ARELEE AREAS; CROP DISTRICT 7A -- ROSETOWN, KINDERSLEY, ESTON, MAJOR; CD 7B -- KERROBERT, MACKLIN, WILKIE AND BIGGAR AREAS)

Producers in the region have made great seeding progress and now have 32% of the crop seeded. This is ahead of the five-year (2014-2018) average of 25% for this time of year and up from 9% seeded last week.

Precipitation this past week ranged from trace amounts to 8 mm in the Rosthern and Saskatoon areas. The Dinsmore area reported receiving 4 mm, the Cando area 3 mm and the Kindersley and Rosetown areas 2 mm. The Dinsmore area has received the most precipitation since April 1 (32 mm).

Cropland topsoil moisture is rated as 20% adequate, 63% short and 17% very short. Hay land and pasture topsoil moisture is rated as 10% adequate, 63% short and 27% very short.

Producers remain concerned about the dry soil conditions and livestock water quality. Pastures have been slow to green up with moisture needed to alleviate the dry pasture and hay land soil conditions.

NORTHEASTERN SASKATCHEWAN (CROP DISTRICT 8 -- HUDSON BAY, TISDALE, MELFORT, CARROT RIVER, HUMBOLDT, KINISTINO, CUDWORTH AND ABERDEEN AREAS; CROP DISTRICT 9AE -- PRINCE ALBERT, CHOICELAND AND PADDOCKWOOD AREAS)

The region has made good seeding progress with 22% of the crop now seeded. This is well ahead the five-year (2014-2018) average of 15% for this time of year and up from 3% last week.

Rainfall this past week ranged from trace amounts to 21 mm in the Nipawin area. The Bruno and Vonda areas reported 7 mm, the Garrick and Spruce Home areas 5 mm and the Lake Lenore area 2 mm. The Hudson Bay area has received the most precipitation since April 1 (52 mm).

Cropland topsoil moisture is rated as 2% surplus, 82% adequate, 14% short and 2% very short. Hay land and pasture topsoil moisture is rated as 1% surplus, 82% adequate, 12% short and 5% very short. Crop District 8A is reporting that 5% of the cropland and 1% of the hay land and pasture have surplus moisture at this time.

Pastures and hay land remain slow to green up due to the cool weather. Producers have indicated that low temperatures are making pre-seeding weed control difficult as there is little weed growth.

Farmers are busy seeding, working fields, applying fertilizer and calving.

NORTHWESTERN SASKATCHEWAN (CROP DISTRICT 9AW -- SHELLBROOK, NORTH BATTLEFORD, BIG RIVER AND HAFFORD AREAS; CROP DISTRICT 9B -- MEADOW LAKE, TURTLEFORD, PIERCELAND, MAIDSTONE AND LLOYDMINSTER AREAS)

Seeding operations are in full swing in the region and 28% of the crop is now seeded. This is just ahead of the five-year (2014-2018) average of 25% for this time of year and up nicely from 14% last week.

Rainfall this past week ranged from trace amounts to 13 mm in the Speers area. The Duck Lake area received 7 mm, the Hafford area 2 mm and the Meadow Lake area 3 mm. The Neilburg area has received the most precipitation since April 1 (30 mm).

The majority of fields have adequate topsoil moisture, although some areas remain short of moisture. Cropland topsoil moisture is rated as 1% surplus, 66% adequate, 27% short and 6% very short. Hay land and pasture topsoil moisture is rated as 55% adequate, 35% short and 10% very short.

Pasture growth is slow and producers are waiting for better growing conditions. Farmers are busy seeding and working fields.


ONTARIO CROP REPORT

Ontario Sees Small Number of Acres Planted

OMAHA (DTN) -- The following are highlights from the Ontario Field Crop Report from Ontario Ministry of Agriculture, Food and Rural Affairs, for the week of May 10, released May 17.

A small number of acres were planted on the lighter soils across Ontario, where conditions permitted, but to date less than 10% of corn is in the ground. Rainfall amounts continue to vary across the province, however ongoing lack of heat and sunshine are the biggest culprits in delaying progress.

OMAHA (DTN) -- The following are highlights from the Ontario Field Crop Report from Ontario Ministry of Agriculture, Food and Rural Affairs, for the week of May 13, released May 16.

The weather story continues this week with very little change across the province in terms of field activity, including fertilizer and pesticide application to wheat, manure application, field preparation and planting.

A small number of acres were planted on the lighter soils across Ontario, where conditions permitted, but to date less than 10% of corn is in the ground. Rainfall amounts continue to vary across the province, however ongoing lack of heat and sunshine are the biggest culprits in delaying progress.

MANURE APPLICATION

Late-harvest, wet soil conditions during fall of 2018, followed by current persistent wet weather have left many manure storages close to overflowing. Some emergency application has contributed to increased ruts and compaction.

Consider planting at least some of the corn when soils are finally fit for planting, and then apply the liquid manure after planting. With draghose systems, manure can be applied without hose damage to corn until sometime before the corn gets to the 4-leaf (collar) stage. Not only will it improve nutrient use efficiency, but manure can be applied when soil conditions are more suitable. This helps prevent compaction, improve yield and can spread out some of the manure application workload in a delayed spring season.

Other in-crop opportunities include application after forage harvest and application to soybean and edible bean fields. For application to bean crops, application rates should apply between 40-60 lbs of N as ammonium (NH4-N) to prevent lodging. A sample should be taken for analysis to determine the N-P-K and sulfur applied. Manure application after wheat harvest, ideally with cover crops, is the ideal timing to avoid compaction and help with workload management.

WEED CONTROL

Winter annual and perennial weeds are getting bigger and some species, like dandelion, will require higher rates of glyphosate (e.g. 1.34 liters/acre of glyphosate 540 g/L) to achieve adequate control. Glyphosate resistant weeds like Canada fleabane are getting larger as well, spray coverage will be important to maximize control so increasing water volumes will help with improving coverage.

WHEAT

Eventual sun and warm weather will result in a flurry of activity. The to-do lists are long; therefore, prioritize activities and combine tasks when possible. A few guidelines to maximize wheat yield potential, especially on questionable fields:

-- Do not apply nitrogen, sulphur, herbicide and fungicide in one application.

-- Priority should be made on nitrogen and sulphur applications, followed by a herbicide application three days later if necessary.

-- If there is no disease pressure, then a fungicide tank-mixed with herbicides is not warranted.

Lack of growth in wheat fields continues to be a concern with a high number of acres still without full N application, and some still awaiting the "keep or release" decision. The good news for the reduced wheat crop is there is very little disease to date with the exception of powdery mildew.

Producers should continue to scout for Septoria and virus diseases, and with sunshine and heat, physiological fleck will show up on some susceptible varieties. Stripe rust has been reported in one field in western Kentucky (Princeton -- May 15) and has not been of concern in the U.S. to date, even though potential for infection for stripe rust is higher in cool, humid conditions.

CORN AND SOYBEANS

Early season soil pathogens thrive under current cool, wet conditions. For producers planting into less-than-ideal soil conditions, the result could be more early season seed rots, seedling blights and/or root rots showing up in corn and soybean fields, especially on heavier soil textures. Some of the most common culprits in corn and soybeans are pythium, fusarium, rhizoctonia as well as phytophthora but just on soybeans. When it comes to early season diseases, there is very little genetic resistance available in most corn hybrids or soybean varieties. Fungicide seed treatments are necessary to economically and effectively manage early season diseases since genetic resistance is often not enough under wet conditions on the clays. To avoid replants, especially in fields with chronic standing water, some seed companies and retailers are adding additional metalaxyl or similar fungicide active ingredient to the seed which will provide additional phytophthora and phythium root rot protection.

Other soybean diseases such as fusarium root rot and sudden death syndrome will benefit from these cool, wet conditions especially if conditions become drier in June followed by rain events. Again, fungicide seed treatments will provide some protection.

CANOLA

Ideally, spring canola is planted before mid-May, but planting opportunities have been limited to date. The crop insurance deadline for planting is June 10 for Area E (northern Ontario), June 5 for Area D (Bruce, Grey, Dufferin, north Simcoe, etc.) and May 31 for areas A, B and C. Late planting increases the chances of having swede midge pressure before the crop bolts, and of having hot conditions during flowering.

Winter canola is now in bloom in most fields where it survived this tough winter and spring. Conditions are good for white mold development. Fungicides should be applied at 20 to 50% bloom. It takes approximately 10 days for plants to progress from first flower to 50% bloom. If stands are thin or uneven, it may take longer to reach 50% bloom.

FORAGES

Winterkill in alfalfa is widespread throughout the province. Producers need to scout their hay fields to determine the extend of the damage. With the planting season barely underway, there are lots of options to address winterkill.

Alfalfa is auto-toxic, which means mature plants produce chemicals that prevent new alfalfa plants from establishing. Stands planted in 2018 will not have this auto-toxic effect, but older stands cannot be patched or followed by alfalfa. Fields with less than 50% loss could be patched. Red clover is a good option to maintain legumes in the stand, while grasses provide more yield. Grass options for patching include Italian ryegrass or more typical perennial forage grasses. Fields that are patched this year should be terminated and rotated in 2020.

Alternative forage crops to replace a winterkilled alfalfa field include red clover, Italian ryegrass, spring cereals or cereal/pea mixtures, sorghum-sudan grass, or millet. Plant into fit soil conditions, ensure good seed-to-soil contact, and plan to meet the crop's fertility requirement. Don't forget to factor in the nitrogen credit from winterkilled alfalfa! Be aware that these crops must be managed differently than alfalfa to get good quality and yield.


MANITOBA CROP REPORT

Spring Cereals 70 to 100 Percent Planted in Manitoba

Spring cereals and peas are 70 to 100% complete across the province. Rapid progress has occurred on seeded canola acres, now at 30 to 60% complete, along with progress in flax, soybeans and sunflowers.

OMAHA (DTN) -- The following are highlights from the weekly crop progress report issued May 14 from the Manitoba Agriculture, Food and Initiatives department.

The highlights:

-- Cool conditions persisted early last week in all of Manitoba.

-- Spring cereals and peas are 70 to 100% complete across the province. Rapid progress has occurred on seeded canola acres, now at 30-60% complete, along with progress in flax, soybeans and sunflowers.

-- Colder, drier soils early in the week caused some soybean acres to be seeded ahead of canola.

-- Pasture and hayland conditions are rated as fair to poor in most areas of the province, and future forage production will be affected by early cattle turnout. Rainfall is required in nearly all areas of Manitoba for successful crops and forages.

Breaking down more details by region:

SOUTHWEST REGION

Very little to no rainfall over the past week has producers concerned about dry soil conditions. Overnight lows still reaching minus 5 to minus 9 degrees Celsius in the region. Only 4 millimeters of rain was reported in the Russell area and there were some localized showers close to Riding Mountain National Park. Most of other areas in the southwest region are without good precipitation.

Cool soil conditions kept some producers out of the field but there was some seeding progress, especially during the weekend. Producers who were waiting for good soil temperatures to seed their canola and soybean crops are starting now. Overall seeding progress is 45 to 50% complete in the southwest region.

Wheat, barley and oats are about 80% done. Warm conditions over the weekend have encouraged early seeded wheat to emerge, and is at cotyledon to 1-leaf stage. Pea seeding is 100% complete and are just about to emerge. Soybeans are 5 to 10% seeded and quick progress is expected this coming week with a favorable forecast. Both corn and silage corn are being planted and are about 50% complete. Canola is about 25% seeded with most acres being planted during the last two to three days as soil temperatures increased.

Winter wheat and fall rye are filling well and most of fields are at the 2- to 3-leaf stage and getting close to weed control timing. They could use rainfall at this stage.

Producers started pre-emergent herbicide burnoff applications in most areas, as crop is getting closer to emerging and weed emergence is widespread.

Diamond Back Moth traps are out in the region. Numbers are very low.

Forage growth is slow but field operations for seeding and fertilizer placement have been going ahead. Dugouts, sloughs and streams remain adequate to low. If dry conditions continue, some pastures may be without water by mid-summer.

NORTHWEST REGION

Drying winds, higher temperatures and no precipitation allowed seeding to progress at a good pace in the region. The exception is The Pas, where a few more days of good weather are needed before spring operations begin. Soil is warming up rapidly and soil moisture is generally adequate throughout the region with dryer soil moisture conditions on the east side of the region.

Daytime temperatures are warming up to the low 20s; however, overnight temperatures continued to dip below zero. There was continued field operation progress and spring seeding during the week, including some harrowing, fertilizer applications, pre-seed herbicide applications, seeding of wheat, silage corn, peas and some canola. Clean-up from the 2018 season continues at The Pas.

Reports estimate that overall, seeding progress in the Northwest Region is 40% complete; there are more acres seeded around Dauphin than the rest of the region.

Approximately 70 to 80% of the spring wheat crop is in the ground in the Swan River area; around Roblin, about 85% of the spring wheat is seeded. Barley and oats are 85% in the ground in the Roblin area. Field peas are 80 to 95% seeded in the whole region. Canola seeding is also underway and estimated at 10 to 20% complete. Soybean planting has just begun, while fababeans around Swan River are 80 to 85% sown.

Winter cereals are greening up well and seem to have made it through the winter in good condition. Excellent snow cover in most fields buffered the prolonged cold winter. Volunteer plants, including cereals and canola, are evident in many fields. Weed growth including stinkweed, dandelions, hemp nettle, thistle, quackgrass and wild oats is general throughout the area. Insect activity is quiet.

Forage growth remains slow with the cool weather and lack of precipitation. Dugouts are three-quarters to half full in certain areas. Warmer weather in the last few days will bring increased forage growth but a rain would be welcome around Dauphin.

CENTRAL REGION

Scattered showers on the weekend brought variable amounts of rainfall across the region. Amounts varied from zero to 15 millimeters. Although soil moisture had been adequate going into seeding, top soil is starting to dry, and germination could be affected. Some producers, waiting for more moisture, chose to plant soybeans before canola.

Although lower temperatures prevailed at the beginning of the week with nighttime temperatures still dipping to minus 8 C, the later part of the week brought warmer daytime conditions with nighttime temperatures staying above zero. Those producers waiting on warmer soil conditions started putting in their canola and soybeans mid week and temperatures in the higher than 20 C range had equipment going strong all weekend.

Good progress has been made on wheat, oats and barley, now 90% complete. Early planted cereals are starting to emerge. Corn has been going in steadily as well with some producers in the northwestern and southern part of the region close to completion. Oilseed crops like canola, flax and sunflower have become the focus in the last week. Seeded acres of canola is at 30 to 40% complete, but will increase rapidly in the next few days. Sunflowers reporting in at 50% done. Potato planting continues in the Morden, Portage and Carberry areas, now rated at 80% complete. Pea acres are nearing full completion. Soybean seeding has been steady now that soil temperatures have risen. They are about 30% complete. Overall seeding is about 60% complete.

Winter wheat, fall rye and perennial ryegrass fields are also benefiting from the warmer weather but could really use more rain to encourage growth. Minimal winterkill being reported in winter wheat this year.

Sprayers are starting to roll out since weeds are also taking advantage of the warmer weather. Preburn herbicide applications are occurring before some canola and soybeans. Early crop scouting has turned up the odd cutworm and some striped flea beetles are out.

Hay and pasture is greening up slowly but needs rain soon or yields will be affected. Pasture turnout is still one to two weeks away and if done too early will affect future forage production. Producers need to be careful not to turn cattle out to pasture too early without supplementation if there is not adequate growth. Otherwise, livestock gains and rebreeding will be affected. Pastures overgrazed last year will be slower to re-grow this spring. The nightly frosts, early last week, were causing added stress on hay and pasture growth. Depleted dugouts from last fall did not fully recharge and are on average three-quarters full. This will affect available water supplies later in the summer.

EASTERN REGION

Scattered showers from 0.3 to 11.5 mm fell across the Eastern Region last week. Soil moisture conditions on cropland across the region were rated as adequate to short. Soil moisture conditions of hay and pasture land were rated as adequate to short.

Soil moisture conditions remain adequate for seeding. This past week producers made very good progress with only short delays due to rain. Across the region, many corn acres went in this past week with some producers moving into canola and soybeans as well.

Overall spring seeding across the region was estimated at 50 to 60% complete. Spring wheat acres are nearing 100% completion, with northern parts of the region at about 80% completed due to wetter soil conditions. Early seeded wheat fields are now at emergence and looking good. Corn planting is about 75% complete with northern parts of the region trailing that value at 55% complete. Corn planting is expected to wrap up this week across much of the region. Canola seeding is estimated at 40% complete with more good progress expected this week. Many producers are also moving to planting soybeans this week with the warmer weather and the mid-May calendar date. Some sunflower acres have been planted as well.

The condition of hay fields is rated as 50% fair to 50% poor with pasture condition is rated at 50% fair to 25% poor to 25% very poor. Fertilization of hay and pasture fields is happening, producers are hoping for rain, as last week's rain was spotty throughout the region. Lagoons being pumped out on hay and pastures and the odd corral is being cleaned out. Pasture regrowth is very slow. Necessity is forcing some producers to move livestock to pasture as they are running out of feed. Dugout capacity is three-quarters to half full.

INTERLAKE REGION

Although the past week has seen overnight lows fall below freezing, daytime temperatures jumped over the weekend. Average temperature range for the previous week has increased to 8 to 9 C. Trace rainfall for most locations, with highest amounts of 4 mm. Producers are concerned about the lack of precipitation in all parts of the region. Forecast rain will be very welcome.

Seeding continues, with some just starting, while others will wrap up this week. Excellent progress has been made, with seeded acres ranging from 40-60% for the region. Most report very good seedbed conditions; spring tillage has dried out the soil surface where undertaken.

Timely rains will be needed to support all crops, as soils are dry below the top 6 inches or so.

Activity has not been rushed due to cold soil conditions, but warmer days will allow rapid progress. Peas and fababeans are seeded. The majority of cereals are in, estimated at more than 85% complete. Some spring wheat is emerging. Canola, corn and soybean acres continue to go in. Some are choosing to seed soybeans before canola. Producers want to avoid flea beetle pressure associated with slow germination due to cold soils, as seen in recent years. Rapid emergence in warm soils will go far to eliminate the problem. Canola is estimated at 20 to 35% complete. Soybeans are estimated at 10-25% complete; corn acres at 10-40% complete. Most progress has been made in the southern part of the region, but all areas have acres going in. Some comment that they are wrapping up seeding earlier than normal.

Winter survival of perennial crops seems to be good, with slow growth under cool conditions. Herbicide applications are being made pre- and post-seeding with warmer weather.

Diamondback moth traps are out. Moth numbers are minimal if any, but striped flea beetles are being found in the traps.

Forage availability is a concern for those affected most severely by dry conditions last year. Pastures were generally overgrazed last fall, compounding concerns. Regrowth has been slow with cold conditions, although some are starting to green up. It should be some time before cattle are moved out; some pastures are currently being stocked due to exhausted hay supplies. This will further stress pastures. High costs and low feed availability are contributing factors.

Rain and warmer weather are needed for regrowth. Native hay supplies are at risk due to poor moisture recharge. Dugout levels are below normal. Water supply is rated as 95% adequate.

(ES/)

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