August 21, 2019
Headlines
Canada Crop Reports
8/16 11:54 PM

OMAHA (DTN) -- The following are highlights from the weekly crop report from Saskatchewan Agriculture, for the period Aug. 6-12. The report was released Aug. 15.

SASKATCHEWAN CROP REPORT:

Despite rain delays in some areas, producers now have over 1% swathed or ready to straight-cut, and less than 1% of the 2019 crop combined according to Saskatchewan Agriculture's Crop Report. The five-year (2014-18) average is 4% combined and 5% swathed or ready to straight-cut. Seventeen percent of the fall rye, 14% of the winter wheat, 3% of the field peas and 1% of the lentils are now stored in bins.

Harvest progress is most advanced in the southeast and southwest regions where 1% of the crop is now combined. Producers in the central regions and north have less than 1% of the crop in bins and expect to be harvesting in the coming weeks.

Rainfall last week delayed harvest operations in the southern regions. Rainfall ranged from trace amounts to 82 millimeters in the Pense area. Provincially, topsoil moisture on cropland is rated as 3% surplus, 78% adequate, 17% short and 2% very short. Topsoil moisture on the hay land and pasture is rated as 1% surplus, 72% adequate, 25% short and 2% very short. The recent rainfall may cause downgrading and quality issues in pulse crops.

Hay yields are below average overall. Estimated average dryland hay yields for the province are 0.9 metric tons per acre for alfalfa; 1 mt per acre for alfalfa/bromegrass; 0.8 mt per acre for other tame hay; 0.7 mt per acre for wild hay and 1.8 mt per acre for greenfeed. Estimated average irrigated hay yields are 2.4 mt per acre for alfalfa; 2.2 mt per acre for alfalfa/bromegrass; 1.9 mt per acre for other tame hay; 1.2 mt per acre for wild hay and 3.2 mt per acre for greenfeed.

The majority of crop damage this week was from strong winds and localized flooding.

Producers are busy hauling bales and grain, getting ready for harvest and desiccating and combining crops.

The following are the results by district:

SOUTHEASTERN SASKATCHEWAN (CROP DISTRICT 1 -- CARNDUFF, ESTEVAN, REDVERS, MOOSOMIN AND KIPLING AREAS; CROP DISTRICT 2 -- WEYBURN, MILESTONE, MOOSE JAW, REGINA AND QU'APPELLE AREAS; CROP DISTRICT 3ASE -- RADVILLE AND LAKE ALMA AREAS)

Despite the rain delays, harvest is underway in the southeast region. One percent of the crop is now stored in bins while just over 3% is swathed or ready to straight-cut. This is well behind the five-year (2014-18) average which is 6% combined.

The region reported significant rainfall last week. The Pense area reported the most rainfall at 82 mm. The Lampman area received 45 mm, the Kipling area 33 mm, the Weyburn area 62 mm, the Briercrest area 58 mm, the Odessa area 65 mm and the Radville area up to 60 mm. The Indian Head area has received the most precipitation since April 1 (352 mm). The rainfall may cause downgrading and quality issues in the pulse crops. However, the rainfall will be beneficial to many pastures, hay land and late-seeded crops in the region.

Topsoil moisture conditions have greatly improved with the rainfall. Topsoil moisture on cropland is rated as 13% surplus, 83% adequate, 3% short and 1% very short. Hay land and pasture topsoil moisture conditions are rated as 2% surplus, 84% adequate, 12% short and 2% very short.

Most crop damage this past week is attributed to localized flooding and strong winds.

Producers are busy hauling bales, getting equipment ready for harvest, desiccating and combining crops.

The majority of crop damage this week was from strong winds and localized flooding.

Producers are busy hauling bales and grain, getting ready for harvest and desiccating and combining crops.

SOUTHWESTERN SASKATCHEWAN (CROP DISTRICT 3ASW -- CORONACH, ASSINIBOIA AND OGEMA AREAS; CROP DISTRICT 3AN -- GRAVELBOURG, MOSSBANK, MORTLACH AND CENTRAL BUTTE AREAS; CROP DISTRICT 3B -- KYLE, SWIFT CURRENT , SHAUNAVON AND PONTEIX AREAS; CROP DISTRICT 4 -- CONSUL, MAPLE CREEK AND LEADER AREAS)

Rain delays last week have slowed harvest operations in the southwest region. One percent of the crop has been combined while just over 2% is swathed or ready to straight-cut. This is well behind the five-year (2014-18) average for this time of year which is 8% combined.

Rainfall in the region ranged from 15 mm in the Gull Lake area to 78 mm in the area south-west of Moose Jaw. The Big Beaver area reported 54 mm, the Limerick area up to 69 mm, the Eyebrow area 41 mm, the Cadillac area 60 mm, the Vanguard area 75 mm, the Webb area 62 mm, the Kyle area 23 mm, the Consul area 24 mm and the Cabri area 25 mm. The area south-west of Moose Jaw has received the most precipitation since April 1 (365 mm). The rainfall may cause downgrading and quality issues in the pulse crops. However, the rainfall was beneficial to many pastures and hay land and late-seeded crops in the region.

Topsoil moisture conditions benefited greatly from the rainfall. Topsoil moisture on cropland is rated as 3% surplus, 79% adequate, 15% short and 3% very short. Topsoil moisture on hay land and pasture is rated as 70% adequate, 26% short and 4% very short.

Crop damage last week was from strong winds and localized flooding.

Producers are busy hauling bales, getting equipment ready for harvest, desiccating and combining crops.

EAST-CENTRAL SASKATCHEWAN (CROP DISTRICT 5 -- MELVILLE, YORKTON, CUPAR, KAMSACK, FOAM LAKE, PREECEVILLE AND KELVINGTON AREAS; CROP DISTRICT 6A -- LUMSDEN, CRAIK, WATROUS AND CLAVET AREAS)

Harvest operations are just starting in the region. There are reports of winter cereal crops that are swathed and ready to straight-cut as well as pulse crops being desiccated. General harvest in the region is expected in the coming weeks.

Some areas in the region received rainfall last week that ranged from trace amounts to 72 mm in the Lumsden area. The Rocanville area reported 22 mm, the Lipton area 32 mm, the Ituna area up to 38 mm, the Elfros area 5 mm, the Earl Grey area 20 mm, the Holdfast area 19 mm and the Kenaston area 16 mm. The Ituna area has received the most precipitation since April 1 (333 mm). The rainfall may cause downgrading and quality issues in the pulse crops. However, the rainfall was beneficial to many pastures and hay land and late-seeded crops in the region.

Cropland topsoil moisture improved with the rainfall. Across the region, cropland topsoil moisture is rated as 77% adequate and 21% short and 2% very short. Hay land and pasture topsoil moisture is rated as 63% adequate and 35% short and 2% very short at this time.

The sources of crop damage this week were strong winds and a lack of moisture.

Producers are getting equipment prepared for harvest and hauling grain and bales.

WEST-CENTRAL SASKATCHEWAN (CROP DISTRICTS 6B -- HANLEY, OUTLOOK, LOREBURN, SASKATOON AND ARELEE AREAS; CROP DISTRICT 7A -- ROSETOWN, KINDERSLEY, ESTON, MAJOR; CD 7B -- KERROBERT, MACKLIN, WILKIE AND BIGGAR AREAS)

Harvest operations are just beginning in the region. Producers are reporting that some winter cereal crops are swathed and ready to straight-cut as well as pulse crops being desiccated. Harvest is expected to be general in the region in the coming weeks.

Scattered rain showers fell across the region last week and ranged from nil to 35 mm in the Tugaske area. The Outlook area reported up to 9 mm, the Dinsmore area 13 mm, the Smiley area 8 mm, and the Kindersley, Kerrobert, Battleford and Phippen areas 2 mm. The Dinsmore area has received the most precipitation since April 1 (278 mm).

Topsoil moisture conditions slightly changed from the previous week. Cropland topsoil moisture is rated as 61% adequate, 36% short and 3% very short, while hay land and pasture topsoil moisture is rated as 58% adequate, 38% short and 4% very short.

Crop damage this week was caused by strong winds, hail and a lack of moisture.

Producers are busy getting ready for harvest and desiccating pulse crops.

NORTHEASTERN SASKATCHEWAN (CROP DISTRICT 8 -- HUDSON BAY, TISDALE, MELFORT, CARROT RIVER, HUMBOLDT, KINISTINO, CUDWORTH AND ABERDEEN AREAS; CROP DISTRICT 9AE -- PRINCE ALBERT, CHOICELAND AND PADDOCKWOOD AREAS)

Producers in the region expect to well underway harvest in the coming weeks. As indicated by producers there are reports of some pea crops being desiccated and winter cereal crops that are swathed and ready to straight-cut.

The majority of the region received little rainfall this past week. Rainfall ranged from nil in many parts of the region to 6 mm in the Tisdale area. The Porcupine Plain and Spruce Home areas reported 5 mm, the Melfort area 3 mm, the Arborfield area 1 mm and the Lake Lenore area 2 mm. The Lake Lenore area has received the most precipitation since April 1 (266 mm).

Topsoil moisture slightly deteriorated last week from a lack of rainfall, which would be beneficial to pastures and hay land. Cropland topsoil moisture is rated as 2% surplus, 86% adequate and 12% short. Hay land and pasture topsoil moisture is rated as 1% surplus, 74% adequate, 23% short and 2% very short.

Favorable weather has allowed livestock producers to make significant haying progress.

Producers indicated no sources of significant crop damage this past week.

Farmers are busy haying, hauling grain, getting equipment ready for harvest and desiccating crops.

NORTHWESTERN SASKATCHEWAN (CROP DISTRICT 9AW -- SHELLBROOK, NORTH BATTLEFORD, BIG RIVER AND HAFFORD AREAS; CROP DISTRICT 9B -- MEADOW LAKE, TURTLEFORD, PIERCELAND, MAIDSTONE AND LLOYDMINSTER AREAS)

Regionally, producers expect to begin harvest in the coming weeks as crops mature. There are reports of pulse crops starting to show signs of maturing in the region.

The majority of the region received little rainfall this past week. Rainfall ranged from trace amounts up to 6.5 mm in the Neilburg area. The Duck Lake and Frenchman Butte areas reported 3 mm, the Mayfair and Turtleford areas 2 mm, the Glaslyn area 1 mm, trace amounts were received in the Prince Albert and Borden areas. The Turtleford area has received the most precipitation since April 1 (357 mm).

Topsoil moisture conditions slightly declined from the previous week. Cropland topsoil moisture is rated as 1% surplus, 89% adequate and 10% short. Hay land and pasture topsoil moisture is rated as 79% adequate and 21% short.

Co-operative weather has allowed many livestock producers to make good haying progress.

Producers indicated no sources of significant crop damage this past week.

Farmers are busy haying, hauling grain and getting equipment ready for harvest.


ALBERTA CROP REPORT

Alberta Sees Provincial Crop Condition Ratings Slightly Decline

Forecasted warmer weather and sunny days will be welcomed to help crops mature and reduce excessive soil moisture into the harvest season.

OMAHA (DTN) -- The following are highlights from Alberta's weekly crop progress report for conditions as of Aug. 13, released Aug. 16 from the Agriculture Financial Services Corporation, and Alberta Agriculture and Forestry, Economics and Competitiveness Branch, Statistics and Data Development Section.

Frequent rain since July accompanied with low temperatures increased excessive soil moisture particularly in the North East and North West Regions.

Hailstorms damaged some mature crops in southern parts of the province and destroyed some field crops in other areas.

Additionally, a light frost occurred in the western to central parts of the Peace Region, with the lowest recorded temperature at minus 10 Celsius. There are concerns of yield and quality loss if a frost happens again, particularly for vulnerable canola fields that are still in the flowering stage across the province.

Forecasted warmer weather and sunny days will be welcomed to help crops mature and reduce excessive soil moisture into the harvest season. Provincial crop condition ratings declined slightly from the previous crop report, two weeks ago.

Currently, 67% of crops in Alberta are in good or excellent condition, compared to the five-year average (2014-18) of 60%. Regionally, crop conditions in the North East and North West Regions declined respectively, by 2 and 9%, due to excessive moisture and cool weather.

For the Central and Peace Regions, crop conditions improved, while it almost remained unchanged in the Southern Region. Harvest operations have begun in the Southern Region and for fall-seeded crops in the Central. Spring-seeded cereals are behind in the Central, North East and North West Regions, due to wet weather conditions.

Provincially, the estimated dryland yield index declined from primary estimates and is now 5% above the five-year average. The index is skewed by higher-than-normal yields in the Central, Peace and North East Regions, which offset below normal yields in the Southern and North West Regions. Yield index in the Southern Region is 14% below the five-year average due to the dry spring, while in the North West Region is 8% below average due to excessive moisture.

Pasture and tame hay growth conditions showed some improvements in the Central and North East Region. However, it declined in the Southern Region due to continuing dry conditions and in the Peace and North West Regions due to wet and cool conditions.

Some producers in areas with excessive moisture are silaging their hay in order to prevent rotting. The provincial average yield for first cut dryland hay is estimated at 1.4 metric tons per acre, which is just above the five-year average of 1.3 mt per acre. However, over the past five years, 94% of first-cut hay across the province has been baled by this time of year, while in the current year only 62% of haying is finished.

Haying is particularly behind in the North East, North West and Peace Regions. Also, the quality of the baled dryland hay is rated as 43% good to excellent compared to the five-year average of 68% good to excellent. First-cut haying in irrigated fields is virtually complete, with yield at 2.2 mt/acre (down from the five-year average of 2.4 mt/acre) and quality is rated as 72% good to excellent. Second-cut haying operations are underway only in the Southern and Central Regions for both dryland and irrigated hay.

The following is a breakdown of highlights by region:

REGION ONE: SOUTHERN (STRATHMORE, LETHBRIDGE, MEDICINE HAT, FOREMOST)

-- Weather turned cooler in some counties, delaying harvest operations. Hailstorms in the first week of August damaged some mature crops. Peas in some fields are being desiccated. Harvest in most areas is underway, with about 10% of crops now in the bin. Some of the poorer crops that did not germinate well in the spring or grow well over the season are being cut for silage or green feed, baled, plowed down or in some cases abandoned.

-- First-cut haying operations for both dryland and irrigated land are virtually complete, with respectively 52 and 72% rated as good-to-excellent quality. Average yield on dryland is estimated at 1.0 mt/acre and 2.1 mt/acre on irrigated land, both lower than the five-year averages. Second-cut haying operations are underway.

-- Pastures have been affected by dryness and hot winds. Pasture growing conditions are now reported as 27% poor, 38% fair, 31% good and 4% excellent.

REGION TWO: CENTRAL (RIMBEY, AIRDRIE, CORONATION, OYEN)

-- Most areas in the region have had excellent growing conditions over the past two weeks and potential yields are mainly strong. Crops are filling well, but are about a week to 10 days behind due to low temperatures and lack of sunlight in July. Hail damage was reported as severe for some fields. More heat is welcome to finish ripening for harvest. Excessive moisture has increased disease pressure, particularly in dry peas.

- First-cut haying operation progress is at 75% for dryland and 85% for irrigated land and second cut is underway. Average yield is estimated at 1.3 and 2.5 mt/acre respectively for dryland and irrigated, both above the five-year averages.

-- Quality is rated as 58% good to excellent for dryland hay and 75% for irrigated.

-- Hay and pasture growing conditions improved from the last report. Pasture growing conditions are reported as 23% poor, 26% fair and 51% good, with similar ratings for tame hay.

REGION THREE: NORTH EAST (SMOKY LAKE, VERMILION, CAMROSE, PROVOST)

-- All spring-seeded crops are in need of warm weather as cool wet weather has slowed maturity. There are some drowned out and yellowed crops from excess water. Hailstorms in the first week of August damaged some crops.

-- Hay yields are reported above the five-year average, but haying operations are hampered by wet conditions. First-cut haying operations are only 47% complete, with the average yield estimated at 1.7 mt/acre per acre compared to the five-year average of 1.5 mt/acre. The quality is rated as 33% good to excellent. The chance for second-cut hay is minimal.

-- Surface soil moisture is rated at 4% fair, 49% good, 30% excellent and 17% excessive.

-- Pasture conditions are reported as 2% poor, 13% fair, 57% good and 28% excellent.

REGION FOUR: NORTH WEST (BARRHEAD, EDMONTON, LEDUC, DRAYTON VALLEY, ATHABASCA)

-- Crops in parts of the region with excessive moisture have deteriorated with roots rotting and disease pressure increasing. Yield potential is affected by wet conditions, but varies depending on the field topography, soil type, seeding date and the actual rain the crop received. Hailstorms in the first week of August hit some fields in the region.

-- Haying operations are delayed in the region, with only 29% of first cut hay complete, compared to the five-year average of 93% complete by this time of the year. The yield for the baled portion of the first cut hay is reported at 1.7 mt/acre, on par with the five-year average, with the quality reported at only 14% good or excellent.

There are some hay fields that were cut but are not yet baled due to the excessive moisture. Hay in these fields is rotting. There will not be any second cut hay, considering the delay in the first cut.

-- As a result of frequent rain, low temperatures and lack of sunlight over the last month, soil moisture ratings are now reported at 11% good, 50% excellent and 39% rated excessive.

-- Pasture growing condition deteriorated from July, but are still in good-to-excellent condition. About 14% of pastures are rated as fair, while 36% are good and 50% are excellent.

REGION FIVE: PEACE RIVER (FAIRVIEW,FALHER, GRANDE PRAIRIE, VALLEYVIEW)

The reported frost in the western to central parts of the region was a light one. However, it could negatively impact yield and quality of cereals, particularly wheat in the dough development stage, and could damage canola crops still in the flowering stage.

First-cut haying operations are 49% complete with the average yield estimated at 1.3 mt/acre, which is in line with the five-year average. Quality is rated as 49% good to excellent.

-- Pasture conditions reported as 7% poor, 38% fair, 46% good and 9% excellent.


ONTARIO CROP REPORT

Year Continues to be Challenging for Ontario Soybean, Wheat Crops

Winter wheat saw a surprise better yield than expected for many growers in Ontario. Sudden death syndrome (SDS) developed early this year in soybean crops in the southwest. Corn particularly in Eastern and Central Ontario are showing typical moisture stress symptoms.

OMAHA (DTN) -- The following are highlights from the Ontario Field Crop Report from Ontario Ministry of Agriculture, Food and Rural Affairs, for the week of Aug. 12, released Aug. 15.

WINTER WHEAT

Winter wheat harvest is winding down across the province and reported yields to date have ranged from 80-130 bpa which compares well to the five-year average yield of 82.7 bpa. This was a pleasant surprise for many growers' considering all the stresses the winter wheat crop had to endure. There are good reports of straw yield averaging 4000 pounds per acre, which is above the average of 3000 lbs per acre.

Wheat quality has been high with very low levels of Fusarium head blight (FHB) which is a testament to the progress which has been made to deal with FHB by increased availability of improved tolerant varieties, disease forecasting, more efficacy fungicides and better timing of these products, etc. Reducing producer risk and economic losses to FHB requires the integration of available cultural and management "tools" or practices into a sustainable program.

SOYBEANS

For soybeans, those areas of the province such as the southwest which have had frequent rain events, the soybean crop in most cases looks good and is advancing rapidly. There's some yellowing due to water ponding (2-plus inches) on the clay soils in Chatham-Kent and Essex are evident. Soybean fields located in dry areas are showing early signs of reduced pod fill, flower abortion, and reduced growth which may affect yields. Diseases, especially sudden death syndrome, Rhizoctonia and Phytopthora root rots and soybean cyst nematode are apparent in many fields.

Sudden death syndrome (SDS) developed early this year in the southwest and symptoms have increased the past few weeks due to the crop stage (post flowering) and weather conditions.

The SDS fungus produces toxins in soybean roots that are transported to leaves and foliar symptoms are more severe after frequent or heavy midseason rains. SDS-infected plants will begin to show distinct yellow speckling or spotting between the veins (interveinal chlorosis).

As the disease progresses, these yellow areas become larger and in severe cases the entire area between the veins becomes brown (necrotic) and dry. The leaves curl from the outer margin. These brown areas eventually disintegrate (fall out) leaving only the veins on the leaf. All through this process the veins remain green. The next symptom is often premature defoliation and death of the plant. In most cases, the petioles (leaf stalks) on these dead plants remain attached to the stem.

Cutting the root and the stem will expose a light brown or gray discolorization of the cortex tissue in the tap root and the stem. This discolorization will extend from the roots up through the stem. Although the leaf symptoms may resemble brown stem rot, in sudden death infected plants the pith (center) of the stem remains white whereas brown stem rot infected plants have a brown and disintegrated pith.

CORN

Corn particularly in Eastern and Central Ontario are showing typical moisture stress symptoms, while in fields the plant variability was obvious during tasseling. This made fungicide application timing very difficult.

Western bean cutworm levels have been low and egg masses have been rare which has allowed many growers to skip insecticide applications. Reports of good natural enemy populations have likely helped alleviate pressure.

Corn varieties that were switched late spring, and were not resistant to rootworm, are being monitored on second- and third-year corn rotations.

Overall foliar disease pressure has been low across the province, but northern corn leaf blight has increased in areas with frequent rains see. Historically, those years where the corn crop was planted late, foliar diseases as well as stalk rots have increased later in the season. The frequent rains, high humidity and foggy mornings in areas of southwestern Ontario are potentially favorable for Gibberella ear rot infection. It is important to remember hybrid, management and the weather conditions through grain fill is critical regarding subsequent mold growth and DON accumulation.

The 2019 growing season has been challenging, but it is important to continue to scout fields. Make note of which diseases, insects or other problems are present and to what degree. Remember every field is different and therefore get in the habitat of doing this for each field. This information in conjunction with harvest data will help you in selecting the appropriate hybrids and varieties geared to your specific needs as well as implement the appropriate management strategies for 2020 and beyond.


MANITOBA CROP REPORT

Variable Yields in Manitoba, Dryness Affects Hay Supply

Yields are variable and will range significantly across the province this year. Hay and forage yields are significantly below average because of dry conditions.

OMAHA (DTN) -- The following are highlights from the weekly crop progress report issued Aug. 13 from the Manitoba Agriculture, Food and Initiatives department.

The highlights:

-- Late-season grasshopper control continues in soybean, sunflower and some canola crops.

-- Yields are variable and will range significantly across the province this year. Farmers that have grain storage space available can list bin space on the Manitoba Grain Storage Listing Service.

-- Hay and forage yields are significantly below average. Producers looking for hay should see the Manitoba Hay Listing Service.

Breaking down more details by region:

SOUTHWEST REGION

Warm weather the prior week quickly advanced crop maturity, together with cooler-than-normal overnight conditions. Rain over the weekend and into Monday occurred throughout the region but amounts varied from 0.4 millimeters at Lake Audy to 37 mm at Bede. Areas along Hwy 16 are still below normal moisture accumulation this summer.

Recent rain will help maintain yield potential in late canola, corn, soybean and sunflower, and rejuvenate stressed out crops.

Winter wheat and fall rye harvest is underway in some areas. Yields look to be average to slightly below average with good quality. Canola is ripening and swathing has started close to Sinclair and Tilston but later-seeded or reseeded canola is out of flowering, and showing some moisture stress.

Diamondback moth larvae feeding looks to be low at this time. There is some grasshopper damage in canola. No major disease problems to report. Early seeded cereals are ripening and producers have started pre-harvest operations. Majority of cereals will be close to pre-harvest stage by the end of the week. Some early seeded barley has been harvested. Late foliar leaf disease noted, but will probably not affect yield.

Soybeans are in late R5 (seed set) to R6 (early pod filling) stage. The crop looks to have handled warm weather well with many pods having three to four beans per pod, but some fields are starting to show moisture stress and prematurely drying down. There's some grasshopper damage present in localized areas.

There are some reports of bacterial blight on soybean leaves.

Peas are mature and ready to harvest. Some forage peas are still green in some fields. There are a few reports of harvested fields to date. Flax fields are now at ripening and dry down stage of development. There are no diseases or insect issues.

Green weeds are a harvest concern in some fields. Corn silks are drying up and the cobs are starting to swell. Recent rains and heat are favoring timely development. Sunflowers are starting to enter R5.8 (full flower -- later stage), though some are still in the R5.1 stage. Grasshoppers and lygus bugs present, thistle caterpillars have moved on. Some basal sclerotinia rot present but at low incidence levels.

Pastures are short and growth is delayed once again. Grass hay yields are average to below average. Some alfalfa stands look decent. Dugouts are 40% of full capacity.

Many producers are looking at poor pasture quality and in some areas will be starting to feed. Some pastures will benefit from recent rains as long as they have not been overgrazed. Some producers are hauling water to pastures as sloughs and dugouts have dried out.

Second hay cut occurring in spots and yields look to be below average with good quality. Cereal silage is being harvested and yields so far look to be average. Corn silage will benefit from recent rains.

NORTHWEST

Minimal rainfall reported through the Northwest region as crops progressed towards maturity this week, except San Clara and The Pas, where 8 mm was received. Average daytime temperatures were in mid-20s Celsius while overnight temperatures dipped below 10 C. Many areas in the region still require rain, although too late to benefit most crops; soil moisture reserves would be improved. High temperatures from the previous week have produced some sunscald and aborted pods in canola. In general, yields so far are expected to be below average to average -- depending on if the area had received enough moisture through the growing season. The Pas being the exception, receiving moisture throughout the season.

Desiccation of field peas continued last week and harvest of peas resumed throughout the week in Swan Valley and Roblin areas. Fababeans continue to mature. Winter wheat has been harvested in the Ste. Rose and Dauphin regions, with below average yields reported thus far; and is ready for harvest in Roblin area.

Some pre-harvest glyphosate applications have occurred on spring wheat throughout the entire region as the crop reaches the appropriate stage and a start to swathing/straight cutting has begun in the Ste. Rose/Dauphin region; the remainder of spring wheat continues to mature

Flax in the Roblin area has completed flowering. Canola in the region has completed flowering for the most part, and is podded, with the exception of later-seeded crops or those that did not germinate until they received moisture. Soybeans in the region range from R3 to R5 in the Swan Valley and Ste. Rose area; R5 in Roblin/Dauphin area and generally, pods are slow to fill due to lack of moisture. Silage corn is cobbed out and maturing.

Warmer weather and moisture is needed for corn and soybeans.

In anticipation of feed shortage, some crops originally intended to be harvested as grain are being taken off as green feed.

Bertha Armyworm monitoring is complete -- there were four traps in the Northwest region which reached "uncertain" levels. They include Durban (394), Minitonas (418), Bowsman (South)(378) and Ste. Rose (403). These numbers are in the "uncertain risk" range (300 to 900) and reflect areas to prioritize when scouting for larvae. There are reports of grasshoppers moving to soybeans in the Ste. Rose area as cereal crops have been harvested -- at this point between the lack of moisture and the grasshopper feeding some soybeans in this area will not recover. Thistle caterpillars have returned in soybeans, as well as Canada Thistle plants. It is important to assess damage before making a decision to control.

Extremely dry conditions are stressing both pastures and hay fields and no regrowth has occurred this week. Grasshoppers have moved to pastures that did have any regrowth and are now moving into annual crops. Many dugouts are very low; with some completely dry and creeks have stopped flowing. Annual silage crops are looking fair to good but desperately need rain. Finding feed for winter supply is very challenging for many producers in the area. Producers are making roadside hay to try to reduce the shortfall. Hay crop yields are 20% of normal to non-existent in the Ste. Rose, Rorketon, Alonsa and Ethelbert areas. Haying is complete in most areas and the Roblin and Swan River areas are reporting some second cut where first cut was taken early. Green feed and cereal silage harvest continues in these areas as well with early reports of average yield. Pasture conditions are dropping with no rainfall this past week and range from poor to fair condition and dugouts are 50 to 75% of normal in the Roblin and Swan River areas.

CENTRAL

Above normal to seasonal temperatures prevailed from start to end of the week. Humidity remained high. No meaningful precipitation fell during the week until Saturday evening when a thunderstorm system developed along the border above the escarpment bringing 15 to 50 mm of rain in the Manitou to Morden area. Topsoil moisture is poor for many parts of the region hastening early maturing crops to ripen and dry down rapidly. Rain is needed for late-maturing crops now in the sensitive seed filling stage.

Early planted cool season crops like wheat, oats and barley are maturing rapidly and harvesting of those crops is going full swing in the Red River Valley, whereas above the escarpment only swathing and some barley harvesting has been done. Late-season crops like corn and soybeans are into the grain fill stage and are in need of rain. Spring wheat yields in the Red River Valley are reported in the 45-65 bpa, dry with low fusarium damaged kernels (FDK). Harvested barley yielding well in the 80 to 120 bpa. Oats is starting to be harvested with yields in the 100-to-135-bpa range. Pre-harvest herbicide applications continue. Winter wheat and fall rye harvest is underway along with perennial ryegrass in the areas below the escarpment. Winter wheat yields reported at 60 to 70 bpa a while rye is in the 50-to-80-bpa range and of good grade and low FDK.

As the cereal crops are harvested, much of the straw is being baled to increase wintering feed supplies. Above the escarpment, rye, wheat, oats and barley crops are ripening fast and harvest is expected to gain momentum.

Corn is in the cob-filling stage and could use rain. Cob development is being limited for lack of moisture. Soybeans in the Altona area are in the R5 to R6 stage whereas above the escarpment R5 would be more typical. Soybeans could use a good rain to help with seed fill especially in the drier parts of the region like the Red River Valley where some plant wilting is noticeable. Soybean aphids have not been an issue as crops develop this year. Field pea harvest is now underway. Reported yields are 40 to 65 bpa and good quality grain. Some pea straw is being dropped and baled as potential livestock feed source.

Canola fields are done flowering and podded. Swathing of canola fields is progressing in the Red River Valley as many fields have reached maturity.

Bertha armyworm trap counts reported have been low to uncertain in the region and some reporting of spraying this canola insect pest in the westernmost side of the region. Flax is turning color rapidly given the warm and dry conditions. Sunflowers are flowering and stressed for lack of moisture, especially on lighter textured soils. Grasshoppers have been causing damage to fields in various parts of the region. They continue to be watched and have required field edge to entire field treatment depending on the population and feeding damage found.

First-cut hay crop is mostly complete with yields running 25 to 50% of normal. The worst tame hay yields in the northern areas are half a round bale per acre. Hay production is below average due to dry conditions but better than expected in southwestern areas. Second-cut haying is underway where growth is sufficient and some report a better second cut than the first. Feed quality is good as harvest conditions have been dry.

Hay and pasture need rain, since growth is minimal or non-existent in drier areas. Supplementing feed on pasture is expected to begin if not already started in areas with poorest pasture conditions. Straw, green feed and other forages are being baled as a source of feed. Livestock water supplies are getting lower affecting water quality and some dugouts are running out of water. Grasshoppers are damaging forage hay and pasture stands and spraying is occurring.

EASTERN

Dry conditions continued last week across the Eastern region with many areas receiving no rainfall. Where rainfall occurred, accumulations ranged from trace amounts to about 10 mm with the highest amounts occurring in northern districts. Unfortunately, it was not enough to improve soil moisture reserves, which continued to decrease throughout the region. More districts in the region became short or very short of soil moisture last week and producers were concerned about losing yield potential, particularly in warm season crops.

Soil moisture conditions on cropland across the region were rated as 65% adequate, 25% short and 10% very short. Soil moisture conditions in hay and pasture lands were rated as 30% adequate, 40% short and 30% very short.

Harvesting of winter wheat, fall rye and grass forage seed is now complete. Average winter wheat yield was about 75 bpa, and average fall rye yield around 80 bpa. Pre-harvest applications on spring cereals are about 75% done, and will continue this week if weather conditions allow. Harvesting of spring wheat has begun. Harvest of barley continued with yield reports averaging 75 bpa. Signs of moisture stress in long season crops was noted including wilting in soybean fields and lower leaf firing in corn.

Scouting for grasshoppers, primarily in soybeans, canola and sunflowers continued throughout the region. Grasshopper migration into canola from cereal crops and hayland was observed. Pod feeding in canola, often on the perimeters of fields, became a concern. Some insecticide applications to control grasshoppers in canola and sunflowers did occur.

Hayfield conditions were rated as 10% good to 20% fair, 40% poor and 30% very poor with pasture conditions rated as 10% good, 20% fair, 40% poor and 30% very poor.

INTERLAKE

A somewhat cooler week, with daytime temperatures up to 26 to 28 C; daily averages around 16 C. Minimum overnight temperatures were down to 3 to 7 C. Trace rainfall continues for most of the region. Humidity levels remain high overnight. Rain is needed as all areas, particularly the north and east part of the region, remain short for moisture. Some crops still hang on from shower to shower.

Topsoil moisture is currently adequate for around 40% of the crops and short to very short for the remaining acres.

Most forage seed grass crops have been harvested. Early yield reports of around 200 lbs/acre meadow fescue, 500 lbs/acre tall fescue, 500 to 900 lbs/acre perennial ryegrass. All yields lower due to lack of rainfall in critical fill period. Reports of timothy crops baled, as seed set did not warrant harvest. Seed trefoil is being harvested; no yield reports to date.

Early yield reports 60 to 75 bpa winter wheat, and 60 to 80 bpa fall rye. Harvest is estimated at 5% complete, and will become more general this week.

Flax fields are showing good color change. Early pea yields are reported in 50 bpa range. Swathing has started in canola, as have pre-harvest treatments. In the driest areas, pod fill at the top portion of the plants is poor, with heat blast evident.

Most soybeans have advanced to R4 to R5 stage. Majority of fields look good, but daytime wilting in many fields indicates lack of moisture. Pod set has been good, but rains will be need to fill properly. Extremely dry soils are a concern for all later maturing crops.

Corn continues to advance; dry conditions are a concern for final yield. Cobs formed have fewer rows than average. Silage corn is tasseling to silking; yields will be lower than normal. All cereals have rapidly advanced, with the heat and drier conditions; premature ripening is evident in the driest areas. A few cereal fields have been harvested, with early yields at 60 to 80 bpa barley and 45 to 60 bpa spring wheat. Some oats have been swathed. Late tillering is a concern in some oats and wheat; either swathing or pre-harvest will be necessary.

Crops have dried out on sandy ridges, evident in cereals, canola and soybeans. All crops are stagey, and shorter than normal.

Short cereal fields have the problem of not enough straw for an adequate swath; some may have to switch to straight cut. Early green feed has been harvested; yields will be better than later seeded crops.

Grasshoppers continue to monitored, some headlands and fields have received insecticide application. Concern has been mostly in pastures, cereal, forage grass fields, canola and corn, and pressure is much higher in the drier areas of the north and southwest. Most grasshoppers have reached maturity. Flea beetles are showing up. Some thistle caterpillar reported in soybeans. Beneficial predator insects are being reported in good numbers.

Green wild oats are evident in a number of fields. Lambs' quarters are poking through in canola now that the crop is maturing. Kochia is becoming more evident, especially at field edges and saline areas -- testing for glyphosate resistance should be a priority, especially when found in glyphosate tolerant crops.

Haying continues where possible, but most is finished. Forage availability continues to be a big concern for the region. Yields are extremely variable depending on moisture levels; yields are coming in at 20 to 60% of average production.

Productivity is best on new stands, and fertilized stands. As crops are short, availability of cereal straw will be limited. Much of the straw available has been spoken for.

Almost all pastures have been grazed down, and are rated in poor condition. Some feeding has begun in the northwest; many expect to be feeding as early as the end of August to early September. More indications of animals going to market due to lack of feed available. Topsoil moisture for hay and pasture is rated as 40% short and 60% very short.

Dugout levels are declining and some are dry. Water quality is a concern in low dugouts. Water supply is rated as 40 to 50% adequate, but significant rain is needed for replenishment. Water hauling to pasture troughs is becoming more common in north Interlake. Some wells are being drilled deeper. More reports of wells drying out. Concern over adequate supply is increasing with continued dry conditions.

(ES/)

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