October 20, 2019
Headlines
Canada Crop Reports
10/18 6:44 PM

OMAHA (DTN) -- The following are highlights from Alberta's weekly crop progress report for conditions as of Oct. 15, released Oct. 18 from the Agriculture Financial Services Corporation, and Alberta Agriculture and Forestry, Economics and Competitiveness Branch, Statistics and Data Development Section.

Wet weather along with below normal temperatures have been the dominant pattern in Alberta during the past two weeks. During the long weekend, large areas in the North East and North West Regions received between 10 to 15 millimeters of precipitation in the form of either rain or rain and snow mix.

For the Southern, Central and Peace Regions, precipitation was mainly light, but variable, with some areas accumulating 3 to 5 mm. The moisture has halted harvesting operations in most parts of the province. However, producers in all regions except for the Southern Region were able to make some progress during the last week before the cool wet weather that prevailed over the weekend.

Provincially, about 59% of major crops across the province have now been harvested, up 14% from last week. Estimates suggest that about 21% of major crops are in swath and 20% remain standing. When compared to the five-year averages (2014-18), provincial harvest progress is 17% behind. Regionally, harvest progress is behind in all regions, led by the Central Region (26% behind), followed by the Peace (25% behind), North East (16% behind) and Southern and North West Regions (8% behind).

Nearly 9% of spring wheat, 12% of barley, 17% of oats and 41% of canola have been swathed. Also, 28% of spring wheat, 18% of barley, 33% of oats, 17% of canola and 5% of dry peas remain standing.

Frost and low temperatures are slowing pasture growth across the province. In some areas, cattle are being moved to harvested fields. Currently, pasture conditions are rated as 21% poor, 40% fair, 37% good and 2% excellent.

Breaking down by region:

REGION ONE: SOUTHERN (STRATHMORE, LETHBRIDGE, MEDICINE HAT, FOREMOST)

-- Snow and cool weather in the region has prevented producers from further advancing harvest. A forecast of more favorable harvest conditions should enable harvest to resume in the coming week or weeks. Some specialty crops have been damaged by frost and may be abandoned.

-- Regionally, 82% of major crops are harvested, 9% are swathed and another 9% are still standing.

-- About 10% of spring wheat, 5% of barley and 9% of oats are still standing. For canola, 68% is harvested, 16% is swathed and another 16% is still standing.

-- Fall-seeded crops are rated as 5% poor, 39% fair, 51% good and 5% excellent.

-- Surface soil moisture conditions (sub-surface soil ratings in the brackets) are rated as 7 (13)% poor, 43 (49)% fair, 48 (37)% good and 2 (1)% excellent.

REGION TWO: CENTRAL (RIMBEY, AIRDRIE, CORONATION, OYEN)

-- Although moisture from previous snow and recent rain has halted harvest operations in some areas, producers in other areas were able to resume harvest. Regionally, harvest advanced an additional 10% of major crops from a week ago.

-- Currently, about 46% of major crops in this region are now in the bin, 27% in are swath and another 27% are still standing.

-- About 37% of spring wheat, 22% of barley, 50% of oats and 7% of dry peas are still standing. For canola, 25% has been harvested, 52% is swathed and 23% is still standing.

-- Fall-seeded crops are rated as 2% poor, 15% fair, 81% good and 2% excellent.

-- Surface soil moisture conditions (sub-surface soil ratings in the brackets) are rated as 3 (11)% poor, 18 (28)% fair, 65 (48)% good and 14 (13)% excellent.

REGION THREE: NORTH EAST (SMOKY LAKE, VERMILION, CAMROSE, PROVOST)

-- Most areas in the region had good progress until snow and rain fell on Sunday, putting harvest operations on pause again. In this region, harvest advanced by an additional 23% of major crops from a week ago.

-- Regionally, about 56% of major crops have been harvested, 25% are in swath and 19% are standing.

-- About 28% of spring wheat, 18% of barley, 23% of oats and 2% of dry peas are still standing. For canola, about 43% has been combined, 44% is in swath and 13% is still standing.

-- Fall-seeded crops are rated as 13% fair and 87% good.

-- Surface soil moisture conditions (sub-surface soil ratings in the brackets) are rated as 2 (3)% fair, 54 (44)% good and 42 (52)% excellent, with 2 (1)% excessive.

REGION FOUR: NORTH WEST (BARRHEAD, EDMONTON, LEDUC, DRAYTON VALLEY, ATHABASCA)

-- Over the past week, harvest advanced an additional 26% in the region, before rain on Sunday put harvest on hold again.

-- Overall, 54% of major crops are now in the bin, 30% are in swath and 16% are standing.

-- About 25% of spring wheat, 26% of barley, 21% of oats and 4% of dry peas are still standing. While 34% of canola has been harvested, 58% is in swath and 8% is still standing.

-- Surface soil moisture conditions (sub-surface soil ratings in the brackets) are rated as 28 (23)% good and 67 (77)% excellent, with 5 (zero)% excessive.

REGION FIVE: PEACE RIVER (FAIRVIEW, FALHER, GRANDE PRAIRIE, VALLEYVIEW)

-- Although damp conditions and low temperatures kept harvest at a slower pace over the past week, producers managed to get in the fields and advanced harvest by an additional 15%, before wet weather started on the long weekend and halted harvest operations again.

-- Regionally, 50% of major crops have been combined, 19% are in swath and 31% are standing.

-- About 50% of spring wheat, 54% of barley, 56% of oats and 14% of dry peas are still standing. While 41% of canola has been harvested, 38% is in swath and 21% is still standing.

-- Surface soil moisture conditions (sub-surface soil ratings in the brackets) are rated as zero (3)% poor, 10 (19)% fair, 69 (59)% good and 12 (17)% excellent, with 9 (2)% excessive.


SASKATCHEWAN CROP REPORT

Saskatchewan Sees Harvest Progress But Still Behind Five-Year Average

Up to Oct. 14, 69% of Saskatchewan's crop is now in the bin, up from 55% last week, but still well behind the five-year (2014-18) average of 88% for this time of year.

OMAHA (DTN) -- The following are highlights from the weekly crop report from Saskatchewan Agriculture, for the period Oct. 8-14. The report was released Oct. 17.

Relatively warm and dry weather allowed some producers to return to the field last week, according to Saskatchewan Agriculture's Weekly Crop Report. Sixty-nine percent of the crop is now in the bin, up from 55% last week but remaining well behind the five-year (2014-18) average of 88% for this time of year. While many areas received mixed precipitation, others received very little and were able to spend more time in the field. The warm and dry weather forecast for next week will allow producers throughout the province to resume combining.

Good harvest progress was made in many regions last week; the northeastern region is the most advanced with 85% of the crop now combined. The west-central region has 77% combined, the southwest region 76%, the northwest region 65%, the southeast region 62% and the east-central region 51%.

Eighty-three percent of the barley, 79% of the mustard, 69% of the canary seed, 68% of the durum, 66% of the spring wheat, 58% of the canola and 43% of the chickpeas are now in the bin. An additional 35% of the canola is swathed or ready to straight-cut.

Many areas of the province received moisture last week, with the Moosomin area reporting 40 millimeters of mixed precipitation. Provincially, topsoil moisture conditions on cropland are rated as 19% surplus, 77% adequate and 4% short. Hay land and pasture topsoil moisture is rated as 10% surplus, 83% adequate and 7% short. Some fields remain saturated with excess water, particularly in southern regions.

Most crop damage this past week was due to lodging, strong winds, localized flooding and frost. Geese and wildlife continue to cause damage by feeding on swathed crops. Reports continue of significant downgrading at the elevator due to crops sprouting. The majority of the crop coming off is tough or damp and is being placed into aeration bins and grain dryers.

At this time, most livestock producers indicate they have adequate supplies of hay, straw, greenfeed and feed grain heading into winter.

Farmers are busy drying grain, hauling bales and combining when they are able to.

The following are the results by district:

SOUTHEASTERN SASKATCHEWAN (CROP DISTRICT 1 -- CARNDUFF, ESTEVAN, REDVERS, MOOSOMIN AND KIPLING AREAS; CROP DISTRICT 2 -- WEYBURN, MILESTONE, MOOSE JAW, REGINA AND QU'APPELLE AREAS; CROP DISTRICT 3ASE -- RADVILLE AND LAKE ALMA AREAS)

Despite frequent precipitation and cooler weather conditions, harvest progress continues to be made in the southeastern region. Sixty-two percent of the crop is now combined, up from 55% last week but remaining well behind the five-year (2014-18) average of 91% for this time of year. An additional 23% of the crop is swathed or ready to straight-cut. The region will need a good stretch of warm and dry weather in order to return to the field.

The region received several days of mixed precipitation last week, with the Moosomin area reporting 40 mm. The Frobisher area received 3 mm of precipitation, the Lampman and Redvers areas 20 mm, the Maryfield, Vibank and Radville areas 10 mm, the Broadview area 16 mm, the Tantallon area 25 mm, the Grenfell area 22 mm, the Weyburn area 9 mm, the Odessa area 11 mm, the Regina area 5 mm and the Ceylon and Moose Jaw areas 8 mm. The Moosomin area has received the most precipitation since April 1 (562 mm).

Topsoil moisture conditions have become significantly worse in the region due to recent precipitation. Many fields remain soft and saturated from excess moisture and are unable to hold heavy equipment for long periods of time. Cropland topsoil moisture is rated at 59% surplus and 41% adequate, while hay land and pasture topsoil moisture conditions are rated as 32% surplus, 67% adequate and 1% short. Crop District 1A and 2A are reporting that 70% and 100%, respectively, of the cropland have surplus topsoil moisture at this time.

The majority of crop damage this past week was due to lodging, localized flooding, strong winds and frost. Geese and wildlife are feeding on swaths and crops continue to be downgraded at the elevator due to sprouting. Much of the grain is coming off tough or damp and is being placed into grain dryers and aeration bins.

At this time, livestock producers are indicating that they will have adequate supplies of hay, straw, greenfeed and feed grain heading into winter. However, some areas are reporting inadequate supplies of hay and straw, due in part to the inability to access fields at this time.

Producers are busy moving cattle, drying grain, hauling bales and combining as weather and field conditions allow.

SOUTHWESTERN SASKATCHEWAN (CROP DISTRICT 3ASW -- CORONACH, ASSINIBOIA AND OGEMA AREAS; CROP DISTRICT 3AN -- GRAVELBOURG, MOSSBANK, MORTLACH AND CENTRAL BUTTE AREAS; CROP DISTRICT 3B -- KYLE, SWIFT CURRENT, SHAUNAVON AND PONTEIX AREAS; CROP DISTRICT 4 -- CONSUL, MAPLE CREEK AND LEADER AREAS)

Less than ideal weather conditions continue to delay many producers in the southwestern region. Seventy-six percent of the crop is now in the bin, up from 71% last week but remaining well behind the five-year (2014-18) average of 93% for this time of year. An additional 13% of the crop is swathed or ready to straight-cut. With warm and dry weather conditions in the forecast, many producers expect to be back in the field soon.

The majority of the region received very little precipitation last week, although the Mortlach area received 12 mm. The Big Beaver, Consul, Gull Lake and Admiral areas received 1 mm of precipitation, the Rockglen and Vanguard areas 4 mm, the Mossbank and Shaunavon areas 3 mm, the Webb area 5 mm and the Tyner area 2 mm. The area south-west of Moose Jaw has received the most precipitation since April 1 (589 mm).

Topsoil moisture conditions have slightly improved in the region due to the drier weather. Cropland topsoil moisture is rated as 9% surplus, 88% adequate and 3% short while hay land and pasture topsoil moisture conditions are rated as 1% surplus, 90% adequate and 9% short.

Lodging, strong winds and frost have caused the majority of crop damage this past week. Geese and wildlife are feeding on swaths and crops continue to be downgraded at the elevator due to sprouting. Much of the grain is coming off tough or damp and is being placed into grain dryers and aeration bins.

At this time, livestock producers indicate that they will have adequate supplies of hay, straw, greenfeed and feed grain heading into winter. However, there are some areas of the region that may have inadequate supplies, due to challenging growing conditions this season.

Producers are busy moving cattle, drying grain and combining as weather and field conditions allow.

EAST-CENTRAL SASKATCHEWAN (CROP DISTRICT 5 -- MELVILLE, YORKTON, CUPAR, KAMSACK, FOAM LAKE, PREECEVILLE AND KELVINGTON AREAS; CROP DISTRICT 6A -- LUMSDEN, CRAIK, WATROUS AND CLAVET AREAS)

The east-central region is slowly making harvest progress when the weather allows. Cool and wet conditions have delayed combining but most producers expect to be back in the field in the coming days. Fifty-one percent of the crop is now in the bin, up from 39% last week but remaining well behind the five-year (2014-2019) average of 82% for this time of year. An additional 25% of the crop is swathed or ready to straight-cut.

Mixed precipitation was received by most areas in the region, with the Esterhazy area receiving 30 mm of moisture. The Langenburg area received 22 mm, the Lipton and Lumsden areas 10 mm, the Ituna area 12 mm, the Raymore area 4 mm, the Elfros and Allan areas 3 mm, the Smiley and Meacham areas 9 mm, the Wynyard and Bethune areas 2 mm, the Craven area 8 mm and the Stalwart area 6 mm. The Lipton area has received the most precipitation since April 1 (615 mm) for both the region and the province.

Topsoil moisture conditions on cropland are rated as 24% surplus, 75% adequate and 1% short. Hay land and pasture topsoil moisture conditions are rated as 12% surplus, 86% adequate and 2% short. Crop Districts 5A and 6A are reporting that 35% and 24%, respectively, of the cropland has surplus topsoil moisture at this time. Some fields remain soft from excess moisture and are unable to hold heavy equipment for long periods of time.

Most crop damage this past week was due to frost, strong winds and lodging. Other causes of damage include feeding from geese and wildlife and crop quality issues such as sprouting. Much of the grain is coming off tough or damp and is being placed into grain dryers and aeration bins.

At this time, livestock producers indicate that they will have adequate supplies of hay, straw, greenfeed and feed grain heading into winter. However, there are some areas of the region that may have inadequate supplies, mainly due to challenging growing conditions this season and inability to access fields.

Producers are busy drying grain, hauling bales and combining when the weather and field conditions allow.

WEST-CENTRAL SASKATCHEWAN (CROP DISTRICTS 6B -- HANLEY, OUTLOOK, LOREBURN, SASKATOON AND ARELEE AREAS; CROP DISTRICT 7A -- ROSETOWN, KINDERSLEY, ESTON, MAJOR; CD 7B -- KERROBERT, MACKLIN, WILKIE AND BIGGAR AREAS)

Significant harvest progress was made this past week thanks to relatively warm and dry weather conditions. Producers in the region now have 77% of the crop in the bin, up from 58% last week and are getting closer to the five-year (2014-18) average of 85% for this time of year. An additional 17% of the crop is swathed or ready to straight-cut. Many producers have indicated that as long as the warm and dry weather holds, they will be able to complete harvest operations in the next couple of weeks.

Little to no precipitation was received across most of the region last week. The Eyebrow area received 10 mm of moisture, the Tugaske area 8 mm, the Hanley and Kindersley areas 2 mm, the Perdue and Cando areas 3 mm, the Rosetown, Sonningdale and Biggar areas 1 mm and the Harris area 4 mm. The Tugaske area has received the most precipitation since April 1 (369.5 mm).

Topsoil moisture conditions on cropland are rated as 87% adequate and 13% short while hay land and pasture topsoil moisture conditions are rated as 78% adequate, 20% short and 2% very short.

Strong winds, lodging and frost were the main causes of crop damage this past week. Geese and wildlife are feeding on swaths while crops continue to be downgraded at the elevator due to sprouting. Much of the grain is coming off tough or damp and is being placed into grain dryers and aeration bins.

At this time, the majority of livestock producers indicate that they will have adequate supplies of hay, straw, greenfeed and feed grain heading into winter. However, there are some areas of the region that may have inadequate supplies, mainly due to challenging growing conditions this season.

Producers are busy drying grain and combining when the weather and field conditions allow.

NORTHEASTERN SASKATCHEWAN (CROP DISTRICT 8 -- HUDSON BAY, TISDALE, MELFORT, CARROT RIVER, HUMBOLDT, KINISTINO, CUDWORTH AND ABERDEEN AREAS; CROP DISTRICT 9AE -- PRINCE ALBERT, CHOICELAND AND PADDOCKWOOD AREAS)

Thanks to warm, dry weather conditions, tremendous harvest progress was made this past week as producers combined almost one quarter of the crop. Eighty-five percent of the crop is now in the bin, up significantly from 61% last week and in line with the five-year (2014-18) average of 87% for this time of year. An additional 12% of the crop is swathed or ready to straight-cut. If the warm and dry weather holds, most producers expect to be done harvest in the coming weeks.

Little to no precipitation was received in the region, although the Humboldt and Hudson Bay areas received three mm. The Bruno, Lake Lenore and Nipawin areas received 2 mm while the Arborfield area received 1 mm. The Hudson Bay area has received the most precipitation since April 1 (373 mm).

Cropland topsoil moisture conditions are rated as 6% surplus and 94% adequate. Hay land and pasture topsoil moisture is rated as 3% surplus, 91% adequate and 6% short.

Much of the crop damage this past week was due to strong winds, lodging and frost. Feeding from geese and wildlife have also caused some damage. Reports continue of downgrading at the elevator due to sprouting. Much of the grain is coming off tough or damp and is being placed into grain dryers and aeration bins.

At this time, livestock producers indicate that they will have adequate supplies of hay, straw, greenfeed and feed grain heading into winter.

Producers are busy applying anhydrous ammonia.

NORTHWESTERN SASKATCHEWAN (CROP DISTRICT 9AW -- SHELLBROOK, NORTH BATTLEFORD, BIG RIVER AND HAFFORD AREAS; CROP DISTRICT 9B -- MEADOW LAKE, TURTLEFORD, PIERCELAND, MAIDSTONE AND LLOYDMINSTER AREAS)

Tremendous harvest progress was made this past week thanks to relatively warm and dry weather conditions. Producers were able to combine almost one quarter of the crop and now have 65% of the crop in the bin. This is up significantly from 42% last week but does remain behind the five-year (2014-18) average of 80% for this time of year. An additional 29% of the crop is swathed or ready to straight-cut. The region will need several weeks of warm and dry weather in order to get the rest of the crop off.

While the majority of the region reported little to no rainfall, some areas received amounts that will delay further progress. The Pierceland area received 16 mm of precipitation, the Meadow Lake area 9 mm, the Barthel area 11 mm, the Turtleford area 2 mm and the St. Walburg area 4 mm. The Turtleford area has received the most precipitation since April 1 (434 mm).

Cropland topsoil moisture is rated as 5% surplus, 85% adequate and 10% short while hay land and pasture topsoil moisture is rated as 1% surplus, 88% adequate and 11% short.

Much of the crop damage this past week was due to strong winds and lodging. Geese and wildlife continue to feed on swathed crop and other crops have been damaged by sprouting and downgrading is expected at the elevator. Much of the grain is coming off tough or damp and is being placed into grain dryers and aeration bins.

At this time, livestock producers indicate that they will have adequate supplies of hay, straw, greenfeed and feed grain heading into winter.

Producers are busy drying grain, moving cattle, hauling bales and combining as weather and field conditions permit.


MANITOBA CROP REPORT

Manitoba Harvest Hit Hard By Snow in Some Areas

Overall harvest progress in Manitoba is approximately 74% complete, below the three-year average of 88% for the third week of October.

OMAHA (DTN) -- The following are highlights from the weekly crop progress report issued Oct. 15 from the Manitoba Agriculture, Food and Initiatives department.

The highlights:

-- Large quantities of wet, heavy snow fell over much of southern Manitoba during the Thanksgiving weekend. Crops in the field are often buried under snow, stems having broken under the weight or severely lodged.

-- Silage corn harvest progressed last week, until the snowstorm, as well as canola, flax and soybean harvest.

-- Overall harvest progress is approximately 74% complete, below the three-year average of 88% for the third week of October.

-- Prolonged power outages are affecting grain drying and bin aeration activities and potato storage heating/ventilation.

Breaking down more details by region:

SOUTHWEST

Snowstorms across the region halted all harvesting progress. The storm brought heavy, wet snow to the majority of the region. Eastern parts of the region were harder hit compared to southern and northwestern districts. Brandon, Neepawa, and Carberry recorded 40 to 70 centimeters of snow. High winds were drifting over roads and accumulating snow in field margins.

Producers rushed to harvest early last week on two or three good weather days. Most producers were doing canola as remaining cereals are wet and quality has deteriorated significantly. Most harvested grains require drying. Harvest is 55 to 60% complete in general. Wide variation exists between geographic pockets. South of Highway 1, progress is 65 to 75% complete, while north of the TransCanada highway, progress is 50 to 60% harvested. Crops between Highway 16 and Highway 45 is about 30 to 45% combined.

Producers are harvesting standing canola or flax before spring wheat due to grain moisture content and perceived value. Soybean harvest has started, with the majority in the southern parts of the region. Some flax fields were also combined, as producers were attempting to harvest standing crop.

Progress was made in chopping corn silage. No harvest started in grain corn to date. Sunflowers have reached R8 and entering R9. Head rot noticeable with high moisture conditions. No harvest started yet.

Weather and field conditions have made producers question as to whether any further harvest of green feed or hay will occur. Soils are saturated. The possibility of putting up corn silage will depend on snowmelt or ground freezing. Cattle are mostly off pasture except for those that plan for grazing beyond the regular pasture season.

NORTHWEST

Harvest stalled in many parts of the region last week due to inclement weather. The exception was The Pas where operations continued up until rain on Monday. Roblin had snow early in the week that melted and fields are currently snow free but wet. Swan River also had snowfall mid-week that melted and some harvest operations took place. Dauphin area was hit the hardest in the region with heavy snowfall at the end of the week that brought all operations to a halt.

Overall harvest progress is 70 to 75% complete. The spring wheat harvest is estimated at more than 95% complete in all parts of the region. Wheat yields are 50 to 75 bpa. Canola harvest is 80% complete overall: 75% at Roblin, 85% in Dauphin, 90% at The Pas and Swan River. Canola yields range from 50 to 70 bpa. Some soybeans were harvested last week in the Swan River area, yields ranged from 25 to 35 bpa. Soybean harvest at Swan River and Dauphin is 75% complete. Soybeans remain standing in the Roblin area. Flax harvest is done in the Swan Valley but 100% remains standing at Roblin. No hemp harvest occurred this past week, but 5% of buckwheat acres were harvested. Producers are moving cows closer to wintering facilities and off pasture. Supplemental feeding is taking place in many areas due to rain, snow and wet conditions. Very little to no supplemental harvest is taking place now to secure additional winter feed supplies due to challenging wet field conditions. Corn silage harvest was progressing with challenging wet conditions as well. Corn silage yields are being reported to be average at 12 to 15 tons/acre. Those with feed left on fields will find it very difficult to bring them to wintering facilities and will have to wait until freeze-up. Many producers are shipping calves, culling cows due to feed shortage, and challenging environmental conditions. In the Roblin and Swan River areas, corn silage harvest continues and is approximately 40% complete with some leaf loss reported due to wind and snow. Roblin received 15 to 20 cm snow on Wednesday that stalled harvesting efforts. Forage growth for the year has halted and producers are grazing stockpiled forage, stubble fields or supplementing on pasture.

CENTRAL

The week started with a couple of good drying days, with moderate wind and above normal temperatures. Wednesday conditions turned cool and damp ahead of days of rain and snow that lasted until the weekend bringing general precipitation across the region. A low-pressure system remained parked above southern Manitoba for days bringing rain, sleet and snow. As much as 50 to 65 cm of snow accumulated in fields in the Red River Valley, the northern part of the region and west of the escarpment. The rain equivalent of the precipitation received ranged from 6 mm in the Brunkild area to 48 mm in the Morden area. Most other parts of the region received 15 to 20 mm of rain equivalent. Many areas were affected by power outages, impacting the ability to run aeration fans for stored grain and potatoes. Harvest progress on Monday and Tuesday was mostly in canola and soybeans. Some of that grain was dry, while tough grain went on aeration or dried before long-term storage. Overall harvest is estimated at 75 to 90% complete with mostly soybeans, field beans, sunflowers, and corn remaining in the region. In addition, canola, flax and cereals remain west of the escarpment. Silage corn harvest progressed where field access was possible. Poorer fields destined for grain are being harvested as silage. There is concern that producers will not be able to chop on a timely basis before the corn dries down to much. Some field beans harvested last week where field conditions allowed. In the Portage area, some field beans that suffered extensive weathering damage over the last weeks were worked under. Harvest progress for this crop is around 45%. Early reported yields ranged from 1500 to 1800 lbs/ac. Early reports after the snowstorm have indicated stalk and pod breakage occurred in dry beans, with visible yield loss now being eaten by geese. Canola harvest is 85 to 95% done with most acres remaining west of the escarpment. Swathed canola fields suffered sprouting damage causing yield and quality reductions. Flax is ripe and harvest progress ranging from 40% west of the escarpment to 100% below the escarpment. Sunflowers are mature with some harvest started in the Red River Valley where desiccation had taken place. Commercial potato harvest continues but has slowed with the wet conditions. Reports of 50 to 65% harvest complete. Heavy snowfall is making grazing very difficult and cattle will need to be supplemented on pasture. Cattle are starting to be rounded up from pasture and brought home. Calves are being weaned and marketed. Hay and cattle yards are very wet making them difficult to work in to move feed, cattle or manure. Livestock producers in need of feed and wanting to harvest additional hay and greenfeed are having difficulty with the wet weather. Early tests of greenfeed are showing signs of nitrates because of either drought or frost stress.

EASTERN

Precipitation accumulation for the week across the Eastern Region ranged from 25 millimeters to more than 75 mm as a mix of rain and wet snow. Most of this occurred during storms on Thursday and Friday. Snowfall accumulations in some areas were as much as 40 cm.

Southern districts received the highest precipitation amounts. Soils are saturated with standing water apparent in all fields. Some rivers and streams are overflowing their banks and flooding fields and pastures. In southern districts, significant flooding is occurring. Reports of bales underwater and full quarter sections of pasture and crops under a foot of water have been received.

A short harvest window occurred (about 36 hours) just before the storms began, when soybean and canola harvesting occurred under very challenging conditions. All the crop was taken in tough with grain dryers and aeration systems being used. Significant field rutting occurred. No field activity of any kind is expected for the rest of this week.

Producers are assuming that significant frost and ground freezing will be needed to access fields and continue harvest. Mould on corncobs was reported along with increasing levels of head rot in sunflowers. A few cereal fields remain in northern districts of the region, but straw has broken down under the weight of recent snow; grain quality has severely degraded.

Canola harvest was 95% complete with an average yield of 45 bushels per acre and good quality. Remaining acres to harvest were in northern districts. Soybean harvest was about 20% complete. Yield reports ranged from 30 to 40 bpa with good quality. Sunflower harvest was about 5% complete with yields of 3000 pounds/acre and good quality reported for oil types.

Corn silage harvest was approximately 40% complete with yields of 15 to 20 tons/acre with the weather continuing to delay progress.

Overall harvest progress for the region was approximately 75% complete.

Areas short of feed have had concerns increased due to not being able to get corn silage harvested and not being able to get a third cut of hay. Some secondary roads have become impassible making the movement of feed and cattle difficult. Feeding areas have become saturated and muddy making feeding operations difficult. Supplemental feeding on pastures continues.

INTERLAKE

Producers put in long hours to get as many acres combined as possible before the rain and snowstorm hit, some still going on Wednesday. Most precipitation came in storms on Thursday and Friday. Rainfall amounts ranged from 10 to 50 mm. Snowfall ranged 5 to 50 cm, with isolated reports higher.

Snowfall amounts generally declined from west to east; higher amounts were seen in some areas in the north. The storms caused power outages affecting farm operations including aeration and drying. The west side of the region was hardest hit, with reports of 1,200 hydro poles down between St. Laurent and Gypsumville; power will not be restored to some customers for several days.

Wet snow has caused crop lodging in some fields, which will further delay harvest operations. Ruts were becoming a problem in many fields prior to the storms. Based on experience in previous years, some producers chose to wait to continue harvest, due to the extensive damage that can affect crops for several years following.

Even with the snow, many soybean and cornfields are still standing well and producers are hopeful to be back in the fields, some as early as the weekend. The wettest fields will not be touched until hard frosts or frozen ground allow machinery back on.

Harvest progress is estimated as 75 to 80% complete for the region, with some areas higher. Yields are highly variable, but much has come in at average to slightly below average. All but the last few cereal fields have been harvested; lodging, sprouting and green growth are issues in remaining crop, and some will be flat on the ground following the snow

Much of the canola is harvested, with many producers finished. Harvested acres are estimated at 85 to 95% complete. Sprouting will likely be a concern in swathed canola, but producers hope to take standing canola off in reasonable condition.

Much of the progress last week was in soybeans, with many producers making a big dent in acres harvested. Some report as much as 50% to 70% harvested, and a few have finished up. Many have not started though, due to poor field conditions and some longer-season varieties. Total harvested soybean acres complete for the region fall in the 35 to 40% range.

Sunflowers are mature and some fields have been desiccated. Early harvest has started, no yield reports to date. Some are standing well, and some have been hurt by the heavy wet snow.

Alfalfa seed harvest is done; some acres have been written off, others are seeing very good yields. Average yield at this point expected to be in the 300 to 500 lb/acre range. Good progress was also made with corn silage, with some complete; many at 60 to 70% complete. In areas where grain corn yield potential is poor, some fields are being converted to silage. Minimal acres of grain corn harvested. Forage availability continues to be a big concern for the region.

Although some supplemental feeding has started, cattle have had extended time on pasture as September rains allowed for decent regrowth. There are indications of more animals going to market due to lack of feed available. Retrieving straw bales off wet fields is now a problem. Topsoil moisture for hay and pasture has improved, but standing water is a concern.

(ES/)

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